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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
. it was days before the 1960 election and she thought i should see it. so she put me on top of a mailbox on this huge boulevard and i watched as this canyon filled in with people. and this very charismatic young man -- i was hooked. i did not know what he was saying. i did not understand what he was saying. how was not that precocious. and i knew it was very important. it was very exciting. now i know from google what he said and part of what he said was i am not running on a platform that says if you elect me things will be easy. being an american 6 in 1960 is very hazardous but with hope we will decide which path we take. i thought back at those words over the last four years because it was parallel to another young candidate. jesse barry had a very difficult life as she had hoped for the future. and i think about what she would have thought, knowing that that little boy shook on the mailbox would be working for the president and that president would be named barack obama. it is incredible. >> politics was a part of the conversation on a regular basis with your parents? >> yes. that wa
to overcome it in this election. i worry about the future. not every candidate will have the particular advantages barack obama that had in his ability to raise money. >> another question from this side? >> there seems to be a growing consensus or perception that, unlike past democratic president, president obama has not left a ideological format of what it means to be a democrat. there is -- there has been a fear that with the party going so big and republicans moving to the right, there could be a battle for the soul of the party in the next four or eight years. do you see a post-obama age -- a civil war-like occasion happening? >> we just pushed the post-obama age off by four years. [laughter] >> i know. even in the next four years? >> what this president stands for -- i talked earlier about the fight we had. i was reading a book some of you may have read that was excellent about clarence darrow. he talked about some of the fights in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. during the gilded age and the progressive era. so much of the dialogue -- there were differences, but the fundam
shortly after the november presidential election. this is an hour and half. >> one of the best things about sitting across from you is that, for all of us who have been part of the institute's staff, we are wondering what you been thinking, with this experience has been like for you over the last year-and-a-half, two years. so tonight, we get to hear for the first time your reaction to the campaign. >> thank you very much. i want to thank the in boyer for the support the university has given the institute politics, including making it possible for us to hire such extraordinary people like steve edwards and been restored and all of the other people -- and ben reeseberg and all the other people. [applause] you have been wondering what i have been doing and i have been wondering what you have been doing. [laughter] >> those who were disappointed by this outcome, the democrats elated by this outcome -- given the conventional wisdom around this campaign, the president's approval ratings that were barely above 50%, often dipping below it, the unemployment around 8%, gdp growth stock of arou
9/11. the anthrax scare. there were also positive things. the election of barack obama i thought was a very positive statement for the country and moving forward in a way out of a fiscal abyss. i could not have imagined a better time to have been here with all of the things that have happened. >> let me ask you to look back over those 12 years and ask what the high point was. >> when we could work together. maybe the single event that would and body that is the gang of 14. john mccain and i put together six other democrats and six other republicans to avoid what was then called the nuclear option, changing the rules, turning the senate into a smaller version of the house, where the rights of the minority caucus are ignored. consequently, we were able to work together that way, crossing party lines, crossing with the id administration wanted done or what the caucus leadership on both sides wanted done, it showed we had a certain independence. i will never forget the late senator robert sitting in an office with us all together, sobbing, saying, we saved the senate. we came to an a
a horizon of 8 months to the next federal election in germany, for instance. greece therefore is the sick person europe. of the world. meanwhile, the united states of america is ungovernable. you have a system in this country that was created to create this country as an ungovernable state. you have congress, the president canceling each other out. how the president -- whoever the president might be -- do anything? you have china -- finding it impossible to provide a replacement for the demand that the west has done away with. so, i do not have an answer for your question. bewilderment. >> my question is about consumer demand and the extent to which the old system depended on it. if we do not have it to the same degree, could there possibly be a new economy? i cannot know how to say all of these in the right economic terms. i will say what i am thinking and see what you make out of it. its teams like all the economy's got to a point where it had to be based on growth. it could not just be sustainable. it had to grow. and that meant more consumers. so, then, that led to a lot of things eco
and sintroduce you to the president. they looked at each other and said yes. 18 years later i got elected to congress and i called reagan's secretary and let me see if i can arrange this. they range did and -- arranged it and mom and kenny came. we went into the oval office and president reagan came over and said, i want to tell you your son is one of the brightest young congressman we have and he is going to do great things. i know you have to wait on tables for 18 years and it worked in a foundry. and danny had to shine shoes. we had those problems in my family. isn't it great we live in a country where you can achieve anything? he had had his secretary called my abbas to find out about me and my family. when i walked data that office, i would have done -- out of that office, i would have done anything for that man. she was so happy and she carried the picture until she died. her favorite actor was ronald reagan. >> a lesson for that about relationships for president is the personal touch? >> it is a big part of it but it was not just a personal touch. he had goals like the strategic de
elements. they got interested. the students got interested. they ended up electing a monitor. i do not know how good the monitor was. there are ways, i think, which you are more likely to think of than i am. taking these ideas and saying, try it out over here and try it out over there. you are building the bar. none of these things -- everything has its drawbacks. you sort of move along. >> the gentleman right here. >> thank you. i have been involved in studying and practicing chinese law for the past 45 years. you, justice breyer, talked about changing the legal culture in china. i wanted to mention one incremental kind of improvement that does not come from the top. i was at a meeting last year to discuss administrative law reform. we were told that central government still does not want to pass a nationwide administrative procedure act. one was drafted in 2003 and it was rejected because it was too much of the professors law because the drafters looked very hard at the american procedure. that has been lying around, as have a draft of the administrative skill litigation law. the leadersh
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)